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Teachers’ Strikes Swell

-Bomi and River Cess In Line

By Esau J. Farr

It is now no secret that the issue of protest or strike in Liberia is the only language or music that the CDC led government understands and as such, public and civil servants rely on it for redress to their plights.

This is and or has yielded timely and quicker results for group of citizens who have engaged in such actions.

It all started with the National Health Workers of Liberia mid this year that resulted to the reported deaths of patients after they were abandoned by health practitioners who went on go slow at health facilities in Liberia.

The striking health workers were later paid, but some complained of salary cuts as a result of the salary humanization scheme introduced by the government of Liberia.

Since then, other groups of government workers have staged protests in demand of delayed salaries resulting to answered prayers.

The recent protest, fresh on the minds of Liberians, is the MCSS students protest in Monrovia that led to the reported brutalization of students with latest information reaching this paper alleging that one of the victims recently died as a result of the maltreatments received during the protest.

Fresh reports coming from Bomi and River Cess Counties speak about continual go slow by public school teachers in demand of delayed salary.

In Bomi, it is reported that about one hundred forty-five (145) public school teachers who have started a go slow in demand of four months’ salary owed them by the government of Liberia.

“We have embarked on a go slow for two weeks to draw the attention of government and the public to our plights,” the President of the Public School Teachers Association in Bomi County, Emmanuel Tokpah is quoted as telling local journalists in the county.

The C.H. Dewey and Suen Mecca District Public schools are some of the schools being affected by the go slow action.

It is reported that parents and students affected by the teachers’ go slow were seen expressing frustration and disappointment over the action of the public school teachers to lay down their chalks.

However, others blamed the government of Liberia for its failure to arrest developing situations, but will wait until it reaches crisis point which sometimes paralyzes normal activities and the movement of people and goods in some places.

Earlier this week and similarly too, some public school teachers in River Cess and parts adjacent began what they described as indefinite go slow in demand of their four months’ salary owed government from July 2019 to present. TNR

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