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‘Zogos’ Want Rehabilitation Programs

‘Zogos’ under the banner, “Operation Restore hope,” the substance users said it is time for change and they are prepared for such to ensure that they contribute their quota to nation building.


The sizable numbers of ‘Zogos’ Monday November 12, 2018 peacefully stood in front of the Foreign Ministry holding placards there-by sending out their message loud through political songs.

“Zogos” in Liberia are homeless Liberians who roam in the streets using various unwanted substances. They are usually considered as ‘criminals’ because of activities they are involved in.

According to one of the “zogos” Frank Freeman, a high school graduate, he has been in the business for over ten years and has benefited nothing adding that it is time to take the exit door.

Frank who attributed his involvement into said bad life style to peer pressure, encouraged his fellow colleagues to desist from the ugly practice and see the need to change and move on with their live so that they too can be welcomed back into their various communities.

“I have three children and I want a new life, but appealing to national government to see the need to assist me and my colleagues,” he added.

Two activists James Koryor and Reuben Logan described the alarming wave of drug abuse by young people across the country as national emergency and therefore challenged national government to address it now.

“These are the same guys who harass, hijacked and steal from you on a daily basis and as such, this speaks volume to our national security once they are not rehabilitated in society, James and Reuben pointed out.

Both James and Reuben said the change for hope that the CDC led Government brags about starts immediately with the young and less fortunate people in society.

The constant Arrest, detention is not the solution to the many problems facing Zogos rather a sustainable and well-funded rehabilitation and other related programs they added is the best way in fully addressing the current nightmare of the country.

James and Reuben told reporters that it is sad for the future leaders of Liberia to be engaged into such practice, but were quick to add that it is still not late to do the right things.

Until their plights can be addressed through the implementation of tangible programs and policies the number of young people mainly substance users are increasing on a daily basis across Liberia.

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